Tag Archives: Special Interest

100 iconic love stories from around the world

For your reading list pleasure on Valentine’s Day, we bring you 100 love stories from around the world (courtesy of Kimberly Mays). This list will show you titles from each country with a brief synopsis. Find your love today!

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Resource Spotlight: Slavery and Anti-Slavery

Students and faculty can gain new insights and context into many subject areas by using the Slavery and Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive database.

Need a chronology? Looking for primary documents? Want to know more about the key people involved? This searchable database provides a variety of credible and vetted primary and secondary resources, ensuring that students and faculty have the highest quality materials for their projects.

This collection includes 5.4 million cross-searchable pages, including books, manuscripts, Supreme Court records and articles, as well as links to websites and biographies. Strong partnerships with the Amistad Research Center, the Bibliothèque nationale de France, the British Library, the National Archives in Kew, Oberlin College, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and many other institutions make this collection both a unique and particularly extensive resource.

If you need help navigating the collection or have any questions, please contact the Reference Desk at 847-214-7354 or libref@elgin.edu.

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Poisoner’s Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York-Book review

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Cover courtesy of Amazon.com

Poisoner’s Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York
By Deborah Blum
614.13 B658p

Interested in true crime? Have you watched all the Forensic Files episodes on Netflix? This book is the story of how forensics began in the early decades of the 20th century, and what cases were pivotal in developing some of the techniques used to pinpoint the guilty.

Although substantive work had been done in chemistry in the 1800s, most physicians didn’t know how to isolate those compounds as processed by the human body. Furthermore, coroners or medical examiners were often appointed positions, with little expectation that they would possess specific knowledge needed for this type of detective work. Enter Charles Norris, who, along with toxicologist Alexander Gettler, was able to set up a methodical system that became the basis for modern forensics.

Each of the eleven chapters cover a different poison, and the time period varies from the years 1915-the mid-30s. You will recognize some of the poisons, such as cyanide or arsenic, but others such as wood alcohol or thallium may be unfamiliar. Each poison is illustrated by a case involving that poison. Some cases involve the poor and unknown, and some were media sensations. All throughout the retelling, the author tells a spellbinding tale of how Norris and his team dedicated themselves to finding justice for the victims (the chapter on radium is particularly heart-wrenching.)

Part history, part science, this work will both horrify and fascinate you and is a worthwhile read for those interested in crime, forensics, and justice.

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–Reviewed by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

 

Need a quiet space? Get a study room!

secret-2725302_640As we come into the final push to the end of the semester, you may find you need to have some quiet time to yourself to focus, or maybe you need to work on a group project while you are on campus. The library’s study rooms are the answer!

Study rooms:

  • Are checked out on your library account at the library’s Circulation Desk on the first floor;
  • Cannot be reserved: they are first come, first served, for three hour increments (you and the key must stay in the library during your 3 hour check-out period);
  • May contain flat screens that can be hooked up to a laptop;
  • On the first floor contain large whiteboards.  Other rooms may have small whiteboards;
  • Are not soundproof, so noise should be kept to a quiet, normal speaking voice;
  • Come in various sizes, so rooms can accommodate as few as 1-2 people, and up to 10 people.

Contact the Circulation Desk for more information or come to the library to check one out! If you have other questions, check out the library’s FAQ on study spaces here.

ECC Librarian Jen Schlau participates in two conference presentations

Jen1Adjunct Librarian Jen Schlau participated in two conferences in October 2018. Her first session was a poster at the Illinois Library Association’s Annual Conference in Peoria, Illinois. The second was a presentation with an ECC English faculty member at the Writing on the Edge Conference at College of DuPage. This is a conference put together by English as a Second Language and English adjuncts for adjuncts.

Jen was a participant in the 2016-2017 Faculty Research Community at ECC. The research community has a cohort of faculty work on research projects for an academic year. While ultimately independently working on a project, the cohort meets together several times each semester to discuss progress and receive support. Jen’s project is titled “Sitting Down with a Librarian: Semi-Structured Research Interviews”. She interviewed sixteen ECC students about how they conduct research and how the ECC campus supports them in doing so. Students in some cases also shared some great ideas about how we can further assist students in their learning and searching skills! More information about participating in the Faculty Research Community and other projects is available at the FRC’s website.

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Her second presentation shared her collaboration on teaching media bias and fake news with an ECC English faculty member. The instructor worked on a current news or issue writing assignment, and Jen developed and taught a lesson plan on helping the students critically read news information and judge news sources. Jen was able to share her knowledge working on this presentation, and she also got some excellent future directions for teaching this topic as well!

Jen can be reached for questions at the Reference Desk (Building C, libref@elgin.edu, or 847-214-7354) at the ECC Library or her individual email (jschlau@elgin.edu or 847-214-7666).

Need something the library doesn’t own? Try Interlibrary Loan!

InterlibraryLoan

Created with IMGFlip: https://imgflip.com/memegenerator

What is Interlibrary Loan:

Interlibrary Loan is the process by which the library will request materials not available in our own collection. Items are delivered to the library and you can pick them up and check them out just like any other library item. Items are usually free.

Why you should care:
This means that you can get just about any item you want, from any library, without having to try to find it yourself, for free.

The service includes books, journal articles, DVDs, videos, and other materials.

Plan ahead–sometimes items can come quickly, but giving a week to 10 days for the item is a good rule of thumb.

Need to use it?
You can find the policies and form here.

For questions, contact Armando Trejo, Archives/Interlibrary Loan Librarian at (847) 214-7141.

Race and Police Brutality in YA Literature: A Review

HateUGiveNothing kicks off a book like a well-made movie of the book.  But Angie Thomas’s first novel, The Hate U Give – title derived from a Tupac lyric – also places a harsh light on reality in many young adult lives.

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer.

What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.  But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

Thomas is not the only YA author to use police brutality as a theme.  Jason Reynolds, who has been called the new Walter Dean Myers, objects, “This isn’t a literary trend. This is an issue of our time.”

All AmericanHis All American Boys, written with Brendan Kiely, features an African-American teenager who is assaulted by an officer who mistakes him for a shoplifter.  A classmate, who is both white and a close neighbor of the officer, witnesses the incident. Will he tell what really happened?

Alter, Alexandra. “New Crop of Young Adult Novels Explores Race and Police Brutality.” New York Times, 19 March 2017, p. A1.

Police violence against unarmed African-Americans has also been well covered through nonfiction, in books like Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Between the World and Me, which won the National Book Award, and Wesley Lowery’s They Can’t Kill Us All.

Between the WorldWhat is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden?

Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children’s lives were taken as American plunder.

LoweryThey Can’t Kill Us All: Ferguson, Baltimore, and a New Era in America’s Racial Justice Movement by Wesley Lowery

A deeply reported book that brings alive the quest for justice in the deaths of Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Freddie Gray, offering both unparalleled insight into the reality of police violence in America and an intimate, moving portrait of those working to end it.

Conducting hundreds of interviews during the course of over one year reporting on the ground, Washington Post writer Wesley Lowery traveled from Ferguson, Missouri, to Cleveland, Ohio; Charleston, South Carolina; and Baltimore, Maryland; and then back to Ferguson to uncover life inside the most heavily policed, if otherwise neglected, corners of America today.

–Written by Mary Spevacek, Reference Librarian
*All cover art courtesy of Amazon.com