Tag Archives: Special Interest

Ideas to help you de-stress during finals week

Studying for finals, finishing up a paper, parents coming for graduation–all of these things can make you feel oh so stressed!

We all know that it is important for our mental and physical health to handle stress in a positive way. This article from Life Hack by Tiffany Mi provides “40 Simple and Brilliant Ways” to help de-stress. Here are some other ways that maybe you haven’t thought of and would like to give it a try

1. Do a crossword or Sudoku. Maybe even old school, with a pencil and paper. Use a pen if you have mad skills.

crossword

2. Watch something nostalgic that reminds you of good times. Whether this is finding old episodes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Twin Peaks, or The Office, or viewing your favorite movie, it is guaranteed to take your mind of your stresses and put you in a better mood to get down to homework later.

buffy

Image courtesy of Ultimate Comic Con

3. Play a card or board game. This is fun to do with your kids or with friends. What Do You Meme? or Cards Against Humanity are fun for adults, but anyone can play Apples to Apples or The Logo Board Game. The laughter that ensues is a great stress reliever.

4. Disconnect from your social media. Just reading about the world’s woes can start to raise the blood pressure. Take a day (or if you can’t take it, at least several hours) and try something off the grid. Unless you are looking at cute kitten pictures (#cutekittens). Then you get a pass.

cute kitten

#cutekittens

5. Finally, set small daily goals. Don’t decide that you are going to study for your exam for 8 hours, finish two papers, AND volunteer for 4 hours. Guess what? You will feel too overwhelmed, and become even more stressed. Look at your online calendar and SCHEDULE a time each day for both work and play during the final crunch.

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What are your favorite ways to de-stress during finals (or any time)? Reply in the comments below!

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian
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Don’t stress about citing!

stressMake your life easier by checking out the citing guide options below.

MLA

APA

Chicago/Turabian

NoodleTools is an online tool that can assist you in organizing your research, including notecards, sharing, and creating your bibliography/works cited page. See the NoodleTools Research Guide for step-by-step instructions.

The Write Place offers writing assistance. They are located in Building B, Room B274. Any student or ECC employee can use this service.  Stop by Building B, Room B274, or call 847-214-7480 for information. Hours:  Monday  and Tuesday 9 am to 7 pm (closed from 3 to 4 pm), Wednesday and Thursday 9 am to 6 pm (closed from 3 to 4 pm) and Friday 10 am to 1 pm.

Don’t forget that you can also get personalized citation help from the ECC Librarians. We are available during all of our library hours (many nights until 10 p.m.) and have experience in the various formats.  Contact us by email, chat, text, phone, and in person.

May is Mental Health Month

There’s a virus spreading across America. It harms the 1 in 5 Americans affected by mental health conditions. It shames them into silence. It prevents them from seeking help. And in some cases, it takes lives. What virus are we talking about? It’s stigma. Stigma against people with mental health conditions. But there’s good news. Stigma is 100% curable. Compassion, empathy and understanding are the antidote. Your voice can spread the cure. Join NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness. Together we can #CureStigma.–NAMI WebsiteCureStigma-Twitter-Header

NAMI estimates that 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. suffer from some sort of mental illness in any given year. As we acknowledge Mental Health Month in May, we wanted to highlight a few resources that can help you explore the topic.

We have many books that can help you explore mental health issues. Look for works under the Subject of mental health or mental illness.  You can also look up the specific issue, such as depression, bipolar, anxiety, PTSD, or stress. Go here to search the library’s print catalog.

mental health

Courtesy of Amazon

We also have many ebook collections; the following two specific collections can be useful when you need to access information online.

Springer: This collection has an emphasis on scientific materials, including psychology.

Ebook Central: This database covers many subject areas. Search a specific term for best results.

For articlesPsycArticles is a great place for psychology research.  High quality, academic, peer reviewed articles are available on any psychology topic.

wellness-wheel-chartFinally, we have great help right here at ECC: Wellness Services.  They have a lot of support services that they offer students, including one-on-one sessions, support groups, crisis intervention and even a Wellness podcast. Contact information: Bldg B, Room B120, Tel: 847-214-7390  or studentwellness@elgin.edu.

To follow on social media, use the hashtag #CureStigma.

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Never Let Me Go Book Review

Never let me goNever Let Me Go Book Review
By Kazuo Ishiguro
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Ishiguro, 2017 Winner of the Nobel Prize for literature, creates a world that seems like a nightmarish mirror of our own. Told from the perspective of Kathy, the novel traces her relationship with both Tommy and Ruth through school and into adulthood where they are groomed to fulfill a special purpose. Although you learn about this purpose fairly soon in the book, the focus here is on the characters and how they react to the future and to their circumstances.

As with The Buried Giant, Ishiguro evokes an atmosphere that is at once realistic and dream-like. This work will make you think about ethical questions and what makes a person human.

There is a movie from 2010 that dramatizes this book, starring Carey Mulligan, Andrew Garfield, and Keira Knightly as the main characters. Although I haven’t seen the movie, I would suggest reading Ishiguro’s work first, as there cannot be a replacement for the way he writes, nor for the atmospheres he creates through his words and descriptions.

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–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

April is National Poetry Month!

poetry monthNational Poetry Month each April is the largest literary celebration in the world, with tens of millions of readers, students, K-12 teachers, librarians, booksellers, literary events curators, publishers, bloggers, and, of course, poets marking poetry’s important place in our culture and our lives. —Poets.org

Here are some nearby poetry events, from Poets.org.

Write a poem a day for a month!

Visit the American Writers Museum in Chicago!

30 Ways to Celebrate National Poetry Month.

Explore different types of poetry in the ECC Library. If you want to browse, poetry is generally found in the 811 section of the collection, although individual collections of poetry can be found in 808.81. You can also search our catalog for your favorite author.

Follow on Social media: @POETSorg on Twitter , #nationalpoetrymonth on Twitter, Poets.org on FaceBook, and #nationalpoetrymonth on Instagram

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Freedom of Information Day is March 16!

Celebrated on President James Madison’s birthday (one of the Fathers of the Constitution and Bill of Rights), this date is celebrated each year to celebrate and encourage openness of government with the people.

This video from the Department of Justice, explains what the Freedom of Information Act is and provides a detailed look at FOIA.

To share on social media, use #FreedomOfInformationDay.

–Written by Maria Bagshaw

Smoke Gets In Your Eyes Book Review

81iybqipdilSmoke Gets In Your Eyes
By Caitlin Doughty
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Imagine your eventual death….what feelings run through you? Mortician Caitlin Doughty hopes some level of peace and acceptance accompanies the sadness and the anxiety. As a child, watching another child fall to her death in a Hawaiian shopping mall, Doughty began her path as a death expert and funeral director. Doughty didn’t agree with the commercial death industry for several reasons, including the potential to up-sell to grieving families, its unnecessary procedures (embalming and its environmental impact), and its dynamic of removing corpses from the view of society (which only elevates our death anxiety). Therefore, she decided the best way to educate society was to go from the inside: enroll in mortuary school. Doughty has since been busy working at her non-profit L.A. funeral home, blogging at her website The Order of the Good Death, and creating an “Ask a Mortician” podcast and video series all in the name of making our culture more death positive. This book is fascinating, creepy, humorous, and well-written. Doughty is a great storyteller: irreverent, witty, smart, and has found her calling. Doughty is very descriptive and leaves nothing to the imagination when it comes to dead bodies, decomposition, and funeral home procedures. Educational and engaging, this work is highly recommended! She also has recently written a book called From Here to Eternity which is another page-turner about worldwide death customs.

Jen photo-Submitted by Jennifer Schlau, Reference/Instruction Librarian