Tag Archives: Special Information

Stress Relief Tips for Finals Week

We are a very stressed society, and not all stress is created equal. A quick Google search will give you thousands of ways that you can help yourself deal with stress during finals week, and beyond. We have posted for several semesters various stress relief ideas and resources; see here for some resources in the library on meditation and yoga.

Here are FIVE ways you can work to reduce your stress–and they are pretty easy!

  1. Use your campus resources.  At ECC, the library, Write Place, Tutoring, Wellness Services, and even your professors can help you manage the parts of writing, research, and dealing with any issues and get you started on a positive path.

  2. Exercise. This can be as simple as a walk or doing yoga. See this article for the benefits of physical activity. You can even walk through the connected buildings or use the track or workout facilities when you are on campus!
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    Via mbinge.co/1twHtKB

    3. If you don’t enjoy exercising, try just watching a sporting event. Disengaging for a short period of time to watch hockey or baseball can help you refocus later, giving your brain a “rest” from the studying at hand.

    4. There’s an app for that: for example, try 14 Stress Management Apps. Set reminders or mantras that will keep you focused and help with time management.
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    5. Eat well. The ECC Cafeteria is open during finals week from 7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. in case you want to grab a quick yet healthy snack. According to this APA article, “Millennials are most likely to report eating to manage stress (36 percent vs. 30 percent of Gen Xers, 25 percent of Boomers and just 10 percent of Matures).” Don’t skimp on your nutrition–try to eat a piece of fruit or choose a salad for lunch. Or do what I do–eat your salad with Doritos or something else not so great so at least you are balancing out your bad with the good. smiley

    Maria2016(2)
    –Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Three Part Series: Library Assessment Snapshots – Part 3

What did you learn at your library instruction class?*

This question allows the library to understand the qualitative aspects of a student’s experience in the library instruction sessions.

Some favorite comments are things like: “I learned how to minimize your research options and make it more efficient” or “Lots! How to research without just surfing the web” or “Librarian did an excellent job. Took away the fear of research and made it easy.”

Below we have listed the most common categories in which we receive comments.

Most helpful thing learned Respondents
Database usage 303
Different resources 72
Keyword searching technique 65
Research techniques 62
Citations 59
Narrowing technique 59
Research Guide 57
Other search technique(s) 46
Internet searching 43
Library website 38
*This three part series will give you a snapshot of the Library Instruction Assessment data, which has been collected from students attending library sessions since Fall 2014. This particular snapshot includes data gathered from 1003 students who attended 91 library sessions in Spring 2016, as well as comments from students in Fall 2016.

Contact Marge Schildknecht (mschildknecht@elgin.edu) for more information about the library’s efforts to improve our library instruction services through this data collection process.

Jana–Submitted by Jana Porter, Reference Librarian

Three Part Series: Library Assessment Snapshots – Part 2

If you’ve been to a library class several times, how was the material different and thus still beneficial to you?*

Perhaps surprisingly the data below shows that students actually find their subsequent library sessions just as beneficial, if not more, than the previous one(s).

Chart_Usefulness

Note in the table above that overall the students never in a library session before (0) gave the session a 4.49. Those in all the subsequent categories gave the session an overall usefulness of 4.53. This suggests that more than one library session is beneficial to most students.

*This three part series will give you a snapshot of the Library Instruction Assessment data, which has been collected from students attending library sessions since Fall 2014. The snapshot is from data gathered from 1056 students who attended 120 library sessions in Fall 2016.

Contact Marge Schildknecht for more information about the library’s efforts to improve our library instruction services through this data collection process.

Jana–Submitted by Jana Porter, Reference Librarian

Three Part Series: Library Assessment Snapshots – Part 1

Introduction

This three part series will give you a snapshot of the Library Instruction Assessment data, which has been collected from students attending library sessions since Fall 2014. The snapshot is from data gathered from 1,056 students who attended 120 library sessions in Fall 2016.

Contact Marge Schildknecht for more information about the library’s efforts to improve our library instruction services through this data collection process.

If you’ve been to a library session before, which class did you take?

The following chart represents the top 10 library instruction sessions as reported by students. The subjects below match the subject areas most often covered in the library sessions, excepting ESL, which is generally taught more frequently than Political Science.

Blog LibAssess1 Chart

Jana–Submitted by Jana Porter, Reference Librarian

New Research Guide: Undocumented Students and DACA

DacaGuideUnder the category “Current Events & Controversial Issues,” the library has created this Research Guide on “Undocumented Students and DACA” or “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals”. The guide includes a four minute video (second tab) about this immigration program created by Obama in 2012, as well as information to keep informed on current government policies that appear to be threatening the status of the program. 
 

Tabs include information and articles specific to DACA, links to local and national legal resources (including Centro de Informatcion in Elgin), links to financial and educational resources, a Google news feed on DACA, and how to contact ECC’s Wellness Services department if you need help.

If you know of other related resources send us your suggestions and we will consider adding them to this informative resource.
Keeping your Future Bright at the ECC Library!

Jana


–Submitted by Jana Porter, Reference Librarian
 

The Master and Margarita Book Review

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Cover courtesy of Amazon

The Master and Margarita
By Mikhail Bulgakov
FIC B933m

“Once upon a time there was a lady. She had no children, and no happiness either. And at first she cried for a long time, but then she became wicked…”

Poor Margarita. She loved the Master, but he left her in the night. She didn’t know where he went, and spent her days tormented. Was he even alive? Where had he gone? Only the devil knows. Luckily, the devil happened to be visiting Moscow and needed Margarita to help host the Satan’s Grand Ball.  And Margarita wanted to find her Master.

But, Margarita and the Master are only a small part of this story. This is a story about a time in Russia when people were not free to speak, were suspicious of foreigners (and not allowed to keep foreign currency), could not believe in God (forced atheism), and it was damn near impossible to get an apartment in Moscow. The author, Mikhail Bulgakov, couldn’t even publish this story during his lifetime. He started writing the novel in 1928, but it was not published until 1969.

Despite being written almost 90 years ago, it is still relevant to our time. We have a President that believes in “alternative facts” and censors information. Are we that far from 1930s Russia? Only the devil knows.

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–Submitted by Kristina Howard, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Get ready to celebrate Black History Month at ECC!

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February is designated as African American History Month. The ECC Library has many resources related to black history, culture, and the arts.

Look for works in our catalog with the subject African American; the titles below are some of our newest selections in the past year.

We have a new database titled Slavery in American and the World; it has cases, legal materials, and statutes as well as pamphlets and books written in the era.

If you would like to find something specific, the librarians can help you with choosing biographies, poetry, databases, fiction, and nonfiction works.  Contact us and we are happy to help!

Elgin Community College also has a wonderful month of festivities available to the college community and the public; all are free. Contact the Office of Student Life at 847-214-7078 for more information on event times and venues.

Maria2016(2)
–Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian