Tag Archives: Special Information

July is National Culinary Arts Month!

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According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, jobs in the culinary arts (such as a chef) are increasing at a faster rate than the average job.

Employment of food preparation and serving related occupations is projected to grow 9 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations, a gain of about 1.2 million jobs. Population and income growth are expected to result in greater consumer demand for food at a variety of dining places, including restaurants and grocery stores.–Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2017

As a reminder, the library has many resources available to you that can help you gain an edge in your chosen culinary field. Check out the resources below to keep up with current issues, best practices, current news, and more.

Magazines in the library (available for checkout):

  • Chef
  • Bon Appetit
  • Cooking Light
  • Cook’s Illustrated
  • Food Magazine
  • Saveur

Online trade publications:

Newspapers:

The library has access to thousands of newspaper articles, from local papers such as the Chicago Tribune and Daily Herald, to around the globe. Search the newspaper collections individually for current news on food trends or foodborne illness outbreaks.

Ebooks:

Plunkett Research: Find market research, industry Statistics, trends and in-depth analysis of companies, including industries such as Hotels & Travel, Green Technology, International Companies, Retailing, and Sports.

Gale Virtual Reference Library: Contains many works related to food, such as Food: In Context, Career Opportunities in the Food and Beverage Industry, and Encyclopedia of Food and Culture.

Ebook Central: Search by a term such as culinary, cuisine or cooking for many culinary works, from the scholarly to the practical.

Print books:

These books are available in our library.  Click here to view a list of books under the subject of Cooking. We also have cookbooks by well-known chefs, including Bobby Flay, Ina Garten, Emeril, Rachael Ray, Julia Child, Jacques Pepin, and more.

Selected works:beatenseared

Beaten, Seared, and Sauced: On Becoming a Chef at the Culinary Institute of America 

American Home Cooking: A Popular History

Vegan Vegetarian Omnivore

1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die1000places

The Making of a Chef

saltfatbookSalt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking

Coming to my Senses: The Making of a Counterculture Cook

The Jemima Code: Two Centuries of African-American Cookbooks

100 Million Years of Food

Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation

Professional Baking

Kings of Pastry (DVD) Foodfights

Food Fights and Culture Wars: A Secret History of Taste

*All covers courtesy of Amazon.com

–Updated and revised by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

 

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Free quiet! Get a room…

group study….a study room!

Need a peaceful, quiet study space?  Want to work on a group project?  The library’s study rooms are the answer!

Study rooms:

  • Are checked out on your library account at the library’s Circulation Desk on the first floor;
  • Cannot be reserved: they are first come, first served, for three hour increments (you and the key must stay in the library during your 3 hour check-out period);
  • May contain flat screens that can be hooked up to a laptop;
  • On the first floor contain large whiteboards.  Other rooms may have small whiteboards;
  • Come in various sizes, so rooms can accommodate as few as 1-2 people, and up to 10 people.

Contact the Circulation Desk for more information or come to the library to check one out! If you have other questions, check out the library’s FAQ on study spaces here.

Activate your Library Card!

librarycardNeed to have your information on the go?  Access information from home 24/7? Get a head start on your research?  Then you need to have your library card!

Bring your Student Picture ID to the library to have the barcode on the back activated.  Student IDs can be obtained from the Student Life Office.

Library cards, once activated, expire when your Student ID expires. 

Please contact the Circulation Desk at 847-214-7337 or email circdesk@elgin.edu if you have questions or to activate your card remotely.

Studying for finals making you stressed? Get a study room!

Don’t make yourself crazy–check out a study room if you need quiet or want to work on a group project.

Study rooms:

*Are checked out on your library account at the library’s Circulation Desk on the first floor;

*Cannot be reserved: they are first come, first served, for three hour increments (you and the key must stay in the library during your 3 hour check-out period);

*May contain flat screens that can be hooked up to a laptop;

*On the first floor contain large whiteboards.  Other rooms may have small whiteboards;

*Come in various sizes, so rooms can accommodate as few as 1-2 people, and up to 10 people.

Contact the Circulation Desk for more information or come to the library to check one out! If you have other questions, check out the library’s FAQ on study spaces here.

 

Library open during Pancake Dinner

pancake

Plan your study session or finish up your research paper at the ECC Library (Building C) on December  4 and get a bonus–free pancakes! The library is also open until 10:00 p.m.

When you need a break, enjoy an all-you-can-eat pancakes, sausage, and coffee dinner from 8-10 p.m. in the Jobe Lounge (Building B), sponsored by the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Student Development.

Building B and the F Building Computer labs will also be open until 10 p.m.

For faculty (and students): Interlibrary Loan

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Photo via Meme Maker

What is Interlibrary Loan:
Interlibrary Loan is the process by which the library will request materials not available in our own collection. Items are delivered to the library and you can pick them up and check them out just like any other library item. Items are usually free.

Why you should care:
This means that you can get just about any item you want, from any library, without having to try to find it yourself, for free.

The service includes books, journal articles, DVDs, videos, and other materials.

Plan ahead–sometimes items  can come quickly, but giving a week to 10 days for the item is a good rule of thumb.

Need to use it?
You can find the policies and form here.

For questions, contact Armando Trejo, Archives/Interlibrary Loan Librarian at (847) 214-7141.

10 Tips for keeping your items (and you!) safe

100px-Australia_road_sign_R3-2.svgIn honor of National Cyber Security Month, we thought we would do a post on safety.

When you are studying and concentrating, it is easy to become distracted. The last thing you need is to lose your work or study materials through theft or inattention.  Here are 10 tips to help keep your stuff safe and private in the library and online:

IN THE LIBRARY:

  1. Keep personal items with you at all times,even when just going to the printer or restroom.  This includes bags, purses, phones, laptops, flash drives, and other items.
  2. Do not put purses or bags on the restroom floor where others could quickly grab them.
  3. Always log off of your library computer before you leave the library so that no one else can access your account.
  4. Report any suspicious or disruptive behavior to the Reference Desk, Computer Help Desk, Circulation Desk, or any library staff.  Do not confront any suspicious or disruptive person yourself.
  5. For emergencies, call the ECC Police at X-7777.  For non-emergencies, call X-7778.

ONLINE*:

6. Strong password strategies (try Diceware or 1Password). Easy passwords equals easy access!

7. Secure your text and calling options: if you don’t have an Apple device, look for online software and apps that can encrypt your information.

8. Update software: often your updates contain critical patches for security issues. Do this regularly!

9. Use a browser that allows you to be anonymous. Tor Browser is one such option.

AND FINALLY:

10. Pay attention at all times to your surroundings.  Don’t be glued to your screen but rather make sure you are keeping physical space and virtual space as private as you can.

ECC has a website devoted to safety issues, including weather, fire, and lockdown procedures.  See the ECC Campus Safety site for more information.

*Some of the online tips providing by the Library Journal article on Protecting Patron Privacy.
–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian