Tag Archives: research

Resource Spotlight: New York Times Digital Subscription

NYT DigitalThe library has a subscription to the New York Times digital edition This is the web version of the New York Times, rather than a database version. It includes full access to all articles dating back to 1851 right from a mobile device or a computer. You can register to have free, personal access through this new subscription.  Here are the steps:

  • Using a student.elgin.edu or elgin.edu email account, create a personal account for full access to NYT from 1851-present.
  • Account registration works best in a Chrome browser.
  • You only need to register at this link once. After that, you can go directly to nytimes.com and login with your personal account.

Access to the New York Times in text form for student research is still available through the library’s newspaper databases.

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Resource Spotlight: Nursing & Allied Health Database

Proquest2This database is just one of the great health databases we offer here at ECC Library.  The Nursing & Allied Health Database via ProQuest includes full text journals and dissertations plus Systematic Reviews, Evidence Summaries, and Best Practice Information Sheets from the Joanna Briggs Institute.

Nursing

The default search is a Basic Search. However, the Advanced Search option also lets you restrict your search by population age, sex, and date. You have all the other great functions you have with all our databases, such as citation tools, print options, emailing, etc.

One of the strengths of this database is that it provides MeSH headings (Medical Subject Headings) for each result. These can also be searched in the Advanced Search option. MeSH provide a controlled vocabulary that you can use for research, which can help you retrieve the most relevant results, and can also provide you with additional keywords when searching other databases and the internet.  For example, when you search for scholarly sources in the medical field, those sources are most likely to use the formal term, such as NEOPLASMS, rather than the popular term of CANCER. MeSH can help you determine what those terms may be.

From the U.S. National Library of Medicine site:

Many synonyms, near-synonyms, and closely related concepts are included as entry terms to help users find the most relevant MeSH descriptor for the concept they are seeking. In NLM’s online databases, many terms entered by searchers are automatically mapped to MeSH descriptors to facilitate retrieval of relevant information.

If you want help using the Nursing and Allied Health database or any of our databases, please contact the library’s Reference Desk at 847-214-7354 or libref@elgin.edu.

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Best Product Review Sites

control-3312776_1280We polled our librarians and library staff for their best product review sites. Although many of us are familiar with Consumer Reports and Amazon, there are often other sites you only hear about through word of mouth.  So from our mouths to yours…

Consumer Reports: This old standby still stands the test of time. You can get to the full text free through the library here (search Consumer Reports), with lots of back issues to explore. Here are two places below you can see years back to the 1980s.

Angie’s List: This review site focuses on the product of SERVICES provided by a company. A great place to see local information if you aren’t sure where to begin.

Good Housekeeping Product Reviews: Go here for beauty, clothing, fitness, appliances, garden, and more. See if your favorite gets the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval!

Amazon: Anyone can write reviews of products, and some are pretty fun (and tongue-in- cheek) to read. You can see their review policies here.

Wirecutter: This site’s “recommendations are made through vigorous reporting, interviewing, and testing by teams of veteran journalists, scientists, and researchers.” More rigorous than some sites, it’s a great place to try for electronics and gadgets, but has so much more.

Top Ten Reviews: Per their site, “for over 14 years, we’ve been one of the largest and most comprehensive product review sites on the web, with tens of thousands of reviews and rankings in categories” that include services, software, business, electronics, and more.

BestReviews: Another good site that does testing and doesn’t accept free products.  They compare the top products in thousands of categories to give you reliable purchasing advice.

Cnet.com: A great place to go for tech reviews (oldie but still a goodie!).

Both Edmunds.com and Consumerguide.com are stellar for a car search and give pros, cons, and specs.

There are many review sites available, from the general to specific. For example, here is an article discussing the Top 28 Product Review sites for Online Marketers.  Consumersearch.com aggregates reviews from many different review sites (so you can find what Wirecutter and Good Housekeeping both say about salad spinners!)

As with all information, it is important to do your homework before committing to a decision! Try out some of these sites to make yourself a savvy consumer!

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, with contributions by ECC Librarians & Staff

Resource Spotlight: Primary Resources

Primary and secondary resources are both important parts of the research process. Primary resources can provide you with a first-hand account of an event as it happened and give you immediate reaction uncolored by distance from the event.

This video explains primary and secondary resources:

The ECC Library subscribes to many resources that have a primary resource focus. To this end, we have created a Primary Sources Research Guide which will walk you through books, databases, newspapers, and more available to you free.

Some to check out:

Librarians are happy to help you navigate or explore these resources; contact us!
–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Resource Spotlight: PsycArticles & PsycInfo

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When students have research to do for psychology class and they need high quality, credible, academic information, they turn to PsycArticles & PsycInfo. But have you considered other aspects of your topic that may have a psychological component?

For example:

  • You may be doing business research on marketing to certain segments of the population. PsycArticles may have research on buying habits and the psychological basis for them.
  • Maybe you are working on a paper on coaching in sports. If you are taking an approach that discusses the role of coach and parents, PsycInfo may have some good information on how that dynamic plays a role in the success of the athlete.

The difference between the two is that PsycArticles contains full text professional psychology journals, whereas PsycInfo has a more comprehensive overview of psychology research and may be full text, abstracts, or just citations.

To use these databases, go to the Article Databases link on the library’s webpage. The databases are in alphabetical order, or you can click on the “P” to jump to those databases.

You will need your Student ID activated as your library card to use these databases from off campus. If you need assistance using the database, please contact the library.

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–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

For faculty (and your students!) Interlibrary Loan

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Image courtesy of  mememaker.net

What is Interlibrary Loan:

Interlibrary Loan is the process by which the library will request materials not available in our own collection. Items are delivered to the library and you can pick them up and check them out just like any other library item. Items are usually free.

Why you should care:
This means that you can get just about any item you want, from any library, without having to try to find it yourself, for free.

The service includes books, journal articles, DVDs, videos, and other materials.

Plan ahead–sometimes items  can come quickly, but giving a week to 10 days for the item is a good rule of thumb.

Need to use it?
You can find the policies and form here.

For questions, contact Armando Trejo, Archives/Interlibrary Loan Librarian at (847) 214-7141.

Resource Spotlight: Research Guides

Research Guides are online guides that provide quick access to databases, websites, books, ebooks and other resources on a given topic or for a specific class or assignment. Research Guides are a great starting point for your research, and have been created in consultation with your instructor.

It does what it says: it “guides your research” to the best sources to begin with on that topic. Guides are set up with tabs that lead you to subtopics within that guide, such as article databases, websites, books/ ebooks, citing, choosing a topic, search strategies, and more.

Tabs

To get started, click on Research Guides on the main library webpage.

Research Guide1

Find your topic on the alphabetical list. Then explore the guides either by the subject area or the guide created for your particular class. It’s that easy!

Research Guide2

To use resources off campus, you will need to activate your student ID with the Circulation Desk (847-214-7337 or circdesk@elgin.edu.)

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian