Tag Archives: new resource

3 new EBSCO databases available for faculty, students & staff

The ECC Library has added in three new, exciting databases to our comprehensive collection!

Chicano Database : This database contains over 2,400 journals going back to the 1900s, focusing on the Mexican-American and Chicano experience, as well as the broader Latino experience of Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans and Central American immigrants from 1992 onwards.

Criminal Justice Abstracts with Full Text: This database is the leading full-text resource for criminal justice and criminology research. Over 320 full text magazines and journals are covered. Subjects include forensic sciences, corrections, policing, criminal law and investigation.

LGBT Life with Full Text: This is the definitive database for LGBT studies. It provides scholarly and popular LGBT publications in full text, plus historically important primary sources. There are 140 full text journals included, and over 160 full text books and reference resources. It also includes a specialized LGBT thesaurus containing thousands of terms.

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Resource Spotlight: Alexander Street Theatre in Video

Covering documentaries and performances for some of the most prominent plays in the 20th century and beyond, this resource provides unique content, including many new performances from Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre collection (Opus Arte), Theatre Arts Films, the BBC, and TMW Media Group.

You can browse the collection by discipline, such as diversity, history, music, or science. In addition to videos and audio, there are over 8,800 books and documents to explore.

Unique to this database is the ability to make a clip or playlist–this can be helpful for students when wanting to highlight a piece as part of a paper or project, or for faculty to include as part of a lesson or use in D2L.

If you haven’t tried this resource, take a look at all it has to offer!

You will need to have an activated Student ID to view this content from off campus. Contact 847-214-7337 to activate your ID.

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

For faculty (and students!) Two new databases

ECC Library has two new databases available for students and faculty to use for both research and for reading recommendations.

Biography in Context:  Biography In Context (Gale) includes more than 650,000 biographical entries covering international figures from all time periods and areas of study. There are also videos, audio selections, images, primary sources, and magazine and journal articles from hundreds of major periodicals and newspapers.

NoveList Plus: NoveList Plus (EBSCO) has reading recommendations for both fiction and nonfiction. It includes reviews from professionals (Booklist, Kirkus, Library Journal, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal), as well as from readers (via Goodreads).

If you need assistance getting started with these databases, let us know at libref@elgin.edu.

Resource Spotlight: Bloomberg QuickTakes in CREDO Reference

As part of the CREDO Reference database, you now have access to Bloomberg QuickTakes, which are billed as “hard to explain topics, explained simply.”  This is a great place to go to get a basic and reliable explanation of an issue.

Once you do a search on the topic of your choice, if there is a QuickTake for the topic, it will appear under the left sidebar, under Filter Your Search: Real Time Reference:

quicktake1.jpg

Here is an example of an explanation of Bitcoin.

QuickTakes are not available on every topic; however, CREDO Reference itself has a great number of definitions and encyclopedic entries that can help you understand a topic.

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian, with contributions from Marge Schildknecht, Public Services Librarian

 

 

New Online Psychology Resource!

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The ECC Library is happy to announce that it now has online access to the DSM 5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition), as well as the Clinical Cases and Handbook of Differential Diagnosis. These resources are used by clinicians, students, and researchers to assist in the diagnosis of mental disorders. The information included focuses on characteristics, treatments, and research of these disorders, as well as presents specific cases and approaches to diagnosis.

Don’t worry–we still have our print versions of the DSM 5 in Reference!

–Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

 

 

 

FREE for you: New York Times Digital Edition!

Good news! The library has a brand new subscription to the New York Times digital edition This is the web version of the New York Times, rather than a database version. It includes full access to all articles dating back to 1851 right from a mobile device or a computer. You can register to have free, personal access through this new subscription.  Here are the steps:

  • Using a student.elgin.edu or elgin.edu email account, create a personal account for full access to NYT from 1851-present.
  • Account registration works best in a Chrome browser.
  • You only need to register at this link once. After that, you can go directly to nytimes.com and login with your personal account.

Access to the New York Times in text form for student research is still available through the library’s newspaper databases.

–Written by Marge Schildknecht, Public Services Librarian

Resource Spotlight: New databases!

new-32199_1280The library has three new databases to add to its digital collections, just in time for Fall semester.

19thNineteenth Century U.S. Newspapers
This newspaper collection includes digital images of articles and full pages, including illustrations and advertising.

slaverySlavery and Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive
This collection is devoted to understanding slavery from a scholarly, multinational perspective.

timesThe Times Digital Archive
First published in 1785, this London newspaper is considered to be the world’s “newspaper of record” and covers more than 200 years of history.

For other primary resources available to students and faculty, see our Primary Sources Research Guide.