Tag Archives: database

For faculty: How to find a journal title in the library’s print/online collections

Full Text Finder is a service you would use if you want to know if a magazine or journal article can be found in its entirety (full text) through our library’s collection.  Many of these journals also allow you to create an RSS Feed and/or Create an Alert, so you can keep up with the latest articles in your discipline.

Find Full Text Finder on the Article Databases webpage, by choosing “F” on the alphabetical list. It is also located under the Research drop down box on our home page under Find a Specific Journal.

To use Full Text Finder, simply type in the title you want to search.FTF search

Once you search the title, if the title is available in our collections, you will get a screen like this, with your link to the full text access:FTF results

You can also browse the journals by discipline (subject area). Click on the subject you want to explore, such as Biology, History, Marketing, etc:FTF discipline

If you need help using this tool or finding out if we carry a particular title, please contact us!

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian
Advertisements

Resource Spotlight: Bloomberg QuickTakes in CREDO Reference

As part of the CREDO Reference database, you now have access to Bloomberg QuickTakes, which are billed as “hard to explain topics, explained simply.”  This is a great place to go to get a basic and reliable explanation of an issue.

Once you do a search on the topic of your choice, if there is a QuickTake for the topic, it will appear under the left sidebar, under Filter Your Search: Real Time Reference:

quicktake1.jpg

Here is an example of an explanation of Bitcoin.

QuickTakes are not available on every topic; however, CREDO Reference itself has a great number of definitions and encyclopedic entries that can help you understand a topic.

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian, with contributions from Marge Schildknecht, Public Services Librarian

 

 

Resource Spotlight: Primary Resources

Primary and secondary resources are both important parts of the research process. Primary resources can provide you with a first-hand account of an event as it happened and give you immediate reaction uncolored by distance from the event.

This video explains primary and secondary resources:

The ECC Library subscribes to many resources that have a primary resource focus. To this end, we have created a Primary Sources Research Guide which will walk you through books, databases, newspapers, and more available to you free.

Some to check out:

Librarians are happy to help you navigate or explore these resources; contact us!
–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Resource Spotlight: PsycArticles & PsycInfo

psycarticles.JPG
When students have research to do for psychology class and they need high quality, credible, academic information, they turn to PsycArticles & PsycInfo. But have you considered other aspects of your topic that may have a psychological component?

For example:

  • You may be doing business research on marketing to certain segments of the population. PsycArticles may have research on buying habits and the psychological basis for them.
  • Maybe you are working on a paper on coaching in sports. If you are taking an approach that discusses the role of coach and parents, PsycInfo may have some good information on how that dynamic plays a role in the success of the athlete.

The difference between the two is that PsycArticles contains full text professional psychology journals, whereas PsycInfo has a more comprehensive overview of psychology research and may be full text, abstracts, or just citations.

To use these databases, go to the Article Databases link on the library’s webpage. The databases are in alphabetical order, or you can click on the “P” to jump to those databases.

You will need your Student ID activated as your library card to use these databases from off campus. If you need assistance using the database, please contact the library.

Maria2016(2)
–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Resource Spotlight: Ethnic News Watch

proquestEthnic News Watch is a database that covers both current and past newspapers, magazines, and journals from ethnic, minority, and native presses. The complete collection also includes the module Ethnic NewsWatch: A History™, which provides historical coverage of Native American, African American, and Hispanic American periodicals from 1959-1989.

This full-text collection covers more than 2.5 million articles from over 340 publications. It is a great place to research on topics related to:

    • Ethnic groups
    • Minorities
    • Multi-cultural
    • Human rights
    • Activism
    • …and individual ethnicities from around the globe
–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

 

 

 

Resource Spotlight: Nexis Uni

SocialBanner nexisReplacing Lexis Nexis is a new, academic based database from Lexis called Nexis Uni.

This database provides a wide variety of authoritative sources, including: newspapers, broadcast transcripts from the major television and radio networks; wire services; non-English language news sources, and legal sources such as law reviews and case law.

Nexis Uni is currently available to on-campus users only.

To learn more about Nexis Uni, check out this video:

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Resource Spotlight: READ IT! Database for ESL/ELL

EBSCO’s Read It! database “was created for anyone who has a good foundation in English grammar and reading skills. It is a place to find reading material about many subjects. Articles are short, and written to support your reading skills as you learn about topics in English that you need for school and everyday life.”

read-it.png
Highlights include:

  • ELL reading level/lexile information available for each article.
  • Users can HIGHLIGHT and LISTEN to a term in context to enable better comprehension.
  • Comprehension tests are available at the end of many articles, with a mix of multiple choice and fill in the blank.  This helps students to test their level of understanding.
  • Users can use REFINE to choose a specific reading level.
  • In an Advanced Search, the user can choose a specific reading level.
  • Articles can be emailed, printed, saved, and cited.

The library has an ESL/ELL Research Guide with additional resources. Within this guide is a tab that provides more in-depth coverage of the READ IT! database.

If you have any questions about the database or using it as a faculty or a student, please contact the library.

—Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian