Tag Archives: book review

Never Let Me Go Book Review

Never let me goNever Let Me Go Book Review
By Kazuo Ishiguro
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Ishiguro, 2017 Winner of the Nobel Prize for literature, creates a world that seems like a nightmarish mirror of our own. Told from the perspective of Kathy, the novel traces her relationship with both Tommy and Ruth through school and into adulthood where they are groomed to fulfill a special purpose. Although you learn about this purpose fairly soon in the book, the focus here is on the characters and how they react to the future and to their circumstances.

As with The Buried Giant, Ishiguro evokes an atmosphere that is at once realistic and dream-like. This work will make you think about ethical questions and what makes a person human.

There is a movie from 2010 that dramatizes this book, starring Carey Mulligan, Andrew Garfield, and Keira Knightly as the main characters. Although I haven’t seen the movie, I would suggest reading Ishiguro’s work first, as there cannot be a replacement for the way he writes, nor for the atmospheres he creates through his words and descriptions.

Maria2016(2)
–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian
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Stay With Me Book Review

stay with me

Cover courtesy of Amazon.com

Stay With Me
By Ayobami Adebayo
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Stay With Me by Ayobami Adebayo  is one of Sarah Jessica Parker’s book Club picks.  I love to get a heads up on a book and am happy to pass along my take on it!
There are a lot of subjects covered within the pretty Matisse inspired cover….
Political activism and protest, family pressures, polygamy and betrayal…  It’s all here.  It is heartbreaking, funny and hard to put down.  It’s definitely worth a look!
This work as also shortlisted for 2017 Baileys Women’s Prize for FictionFor more information, customer reviews, and editorial reviews, see this page on Amazon.
–Review by Kristyn Yemm Pemrick, Library Clerk

Smoke Gets In Your Eyes Book Review

81iybqipdilSmoke Gets In Your Eyes
By Caitlin Doughty
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Imagine your eventual death….what feelings run through you? Mortician Caitlin Doughty hopes some level of peace and acceptance accompanies the sadness and the anxiety. As a child, watching another child fall to her death in a Hawaiian shopping mall, Doughty began her path as a death expert and funeral director. Doughty didn’t agree with the commercial death industry for several reasons, including the potential to up-sell to grieving families, its unnecessary procedures (embalming and its environmental impact), and its dynamic of removing corpses from the view of society (which only elevates our death anxiety). Therefore, she decided the best way to educate society was to go from the inside: enroll in mortuary school. Doughty has since been busy working at her non-profit L.A. funeral home, blogging at her website The Order of the Good Death, and creating an “Ask a Mortician” podcast and video series all in the name of making our culture more death positive. This book is fascinating, creepy, humorous, and well-written. Doughty is a great storyteller: irreverent, witty, smart, and has found her calling. Doughty is very descriptive and leaves nothing to the imagination when it comes to dead bodies, decomposition, and funeral home procedures. Educational and engaging, this work is highly recommended! She also has recently written a book called From Here to Eternity which is another page-turner about worldwide death customs.

Jen photo-Submitted by Jennifer Schlau, Reference/Instruction Librarian

The Buried Giant Book Review

buriedgiant.jpgThe Buried Giant
By Kazuo Ishiguro
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This work by 2017 Nobel Prize for Literature winner Ishiguro is an immersive, engrossing fantasy about an old couple on a journey to discover the unknown. Taking place around the time of King Arthur, Axl and Beatrice strain to remember their pasts, coping with brief flashes of uncertainty that threaten to upend their progress while traveling to reach the neighboring village of their son. They encounter various characters along the way that assist them in understanding both their own quests and pasts, and the quests and pasts of others.

Throughout the work, Ishiguro writes of the “fog” that encompasses not only the couple, but many others in their village and the surrounding countryside. His writing encapsulates that fog for the reader; we are drawn in by the descriptions and the conflict but are not quite sure how each piece fits into the puzzle until the very end.

Lavishly written and heart-wrenching, this book is not necessarily something that gives the reader a “good feeling” when reading it, but it is definitely a book that is lovely to read and whose themes stay with you long after you have finished. As this is my first Ishiguro novel, and because I have read that Buried Giant is a departure for him, I am looking forward to reading more by this novelist.

Maria2016(2)

–Submitted by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Between the World and Me Book Review

Between the world

Cover via Amazon.com

Between the World and Me
By Ta-Nehisi Coates
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Coates writes a series of essays addressed to his son about the state of race relations in America and how this will impact his son’s life. He describes his upbringing and his intellectual development, fostered by  deep reading and exposure to new ideas and people at Howard University; he was also changed by becoming a husband and father. He gives historical context to the black experience in the United States, and then gives us his personal experiences and views. This book is an important contribution to the conversation about race in America.

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–Submitted by Julie Keating, Reference Librarian

Tree of Smoke Book Review

treeofsmoke

Cover art courtesy of Amazon.com

Tree of Smoke
by Denis Johnson

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With the onset of PBS’s broadcast of the Ken Burns film series, The Vietnam War, it’s a good time to revisit some of the novels written about the war. Denis Johnson’s Tree of Smoke is one of the great ones. Winner of the 2007 National Book Award, the novel follows four main characters through their experiences in the war from 1963 to 1970, with a conclusion which takes place in 1983. Two of the characters are brothers of low rank in the military. The other two are high ranking: an uncle and nephew involved in the secret service. Although the book does a good job relaying the wartime atmosphere, especially the constant uncertainty, it does a great job of relaying the sense loss and grief. This book is not for the timid and it took me awhile to get through it, but it is definitely worth the effort.  Denis Johnson was awarded the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction this past July. He passed away on May 24, 2017.

Barb Evans Photo 11-20-13

–Submitted by Barbara Evans, Reference Librarian

Online Teaching Survival Guide Book Review

Online teachingThe Online Teaching Survival Guide: Simple and Practical Pedagogical Tips by Judith Boettcher and Rita-Marie Conrad
371.3344678 B783o

Although published in 2010, this useful guide is a great option for anyone looking to set up an online course from scratch, or for an instructor implementing an online curriculum.

Boettcher and Conrad provide a general overview of best teaching practices in Part One, including guidance on creating a supportive community, providing a mix of synchronous and asynchronous activities, asking for feedback, and wrapping up in a meaningful way. Part Two divides the course into various phases of the class, including “course beginning”, “early middle”, “late middle” and “closing weeks” so the reader can easily use the tips and tools that most match the phase he/she is teaching. The authors give thought-provoking questions throughout that the teacher can think about as part of the course, or use in the class to spur on critical thinking and creating community.

Having taught online classes, I can say that the advice, tips, scholarship, and focus are all useful from day one and many of the items that I have used within my classroom have worked well and have added value and to the students’ successes.

Maria2016(2)
—Submitted by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian