Need help citing? Try these resources!

Hulk citing

 

Image via techatwingra.weebly.com

 

Make your life easier by checking out the citing guide options below.

MLA

APA

Chicago/Turabian

NoodleTools is an online tool that can assist you in organizing your research, including notecards, sharing, and creating your bibliography/works cited page. See the NoodleTools Research Guide for step-by-step instructions.

The Write Place offers writing assistance. They are located in Building B, Room B274. Any student or ECC employee can use this service.  Stop by Building B, Room B274, or call 847-214-7480 for information. Hours: Mondays through Thursdays 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 4 to 6 p.m.; Fridays 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Don’t forget that you can also get personalized citation help from the ECC Librarians. We are available during all of our library hours (many nights until 10 p.m.) and have experience in the various formats.  Contact us by email, chat, text, phone, and in person.

Confused about “Fake News”? We have thoughts…and resources!

Fake news pic

Libraries and librarians are and have always been integral in helping people find balanced, reliable information and evaluating that information for credibility. Rather than using the terms “Fake News”, we like to say “Thinking Critically About the News”, because the idea of “fake” can cover everything from parody, satire, lying, unintentional misinformation, and even news that is biased but contains truth.

Our Thinking Critically About the News Research Guide  (found under Current Events & Controversial Issues) provides reliable and vetted sites to help faculty and students explore the issue of “fake” news and practice their evaluation skills. The guide includes information on bias, exercises, fact checking, a news feed, and more. ” It was created by Library Intern Angela Bouque and compiled and curated by ECC Librarians.

For questions, comments, and additions, or to schedule a library instruction session, please contact the Library Reference Desk at 847-214-7354 or email libref@elgin.edu.

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Need quiet? Get a room…

f5334a7d9827850cb76db6e96becdd372e82815485dcf6d020d14140baaab050….a study room!

Need a peaceful, quiet study space?  Want to work on a group project?  The library’s study rooms are the answer!

Study rooms:

  • Are checked out on your library account at the library’s Circulation Desk on the first floor;
  • Cannot be reserved: they are first come, first served, for three hour increments (you and the key must stay in the library during your 3 hour check-out period);
  • May contain flat screens that can be hooked up to a laptop;
  • On the first floor contain large whiteboards.  Other rooms may have small whiteboards;
  • Come in various sizes, so rooms can accommodate as few as 1-2 people, and up to 10 people.

Contact the Circulation Desk for more information or come to the library to check one out! If you have other questions, check out the library’s FAQ on study spaces here.

Resource Spotlight: NEW! HeinOnline

HeinOnlineHeinOnline is a new database that includes 2,300 full text journals, comprehensive coverage of government documents, all United States treaties, constitutions from every country in the world, and several specialized collections.

In addition to the vast law collection, there is a specialized database called Slavery In America and the World: History, Culture, and Law.  This collection brings together a multitude of essential legal materials on slavery in the United States and the English-speaking world, including statutes, court cases, and other primary and secondary documents.

This new database collection covers many subject areas, including law, government, history, and sociology.  To access HeinOnline, go to the Article Databases list and choose H, or find it on the Subject listing Government & Law.

May is Mental Health Month

2017 MHM FB Profile Image

This year, MHA is talking about Risky Business. We believe it’s important to educate people about habits and behaviors that increase the risk of developing or exacerbating mental illnesses, or could be signs of mental health problems themselves. –from Mental Health America

Use the #mhm2017 and #riskybusiness tags on social media.

NAMI estimates that nearly 1 in 5 adults (18.5%) in the U.S. suffer from some sort of mental illness in any given year. As we acknowledge Mental Health Month in May, we wanted to highlight a few resources that can help you explore the topic.

We have many books that can help you explore mental health issues. Look for works under the Subject of mental health or mental illness.  You can also look up the specific issue, such as depression, bipolar, anxiety, PTSD, or stress. Go here to search the library’s print catalog.

mental health

Courtesy of Amazon

We also have many ebook collections; the following two specific collections can be useful when you need to access information online.

Springer: This collection has an emphasis on scientific materials, including psychology.

ebrary: Ebrary contains many subject areas. Search a specific term for best results.

For articlesPsycArticles is a great place for psychology research.  High quality, academic, peer reviewed articles are available on any psychology topic.

Looking for ways to help with everyday mental health maintenance? Try 31 Tips to Boost your Mental Health.

wellness-wheel-chartFinally, we have great help right here at ECC: Wellness Services.  They have a lot of support services that they offer students, including one-on-one sessions, support groups, and crisis intervention.  Contact information: Bldg B, Room B120, Tel: 847-214-7390
studentwellness@elgin.edu.

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Resource Spotlight: ebrary

ebrary
Ebrary
is an online e-book database that offers access to a wide variety of topics including: anthropology, business, computers, education, English, fine arts, history, language, law, psychology, religion, science, and social sciences.

The database offers the flexibility to browse by topic or search for a specific term.  These e-books offer authoritative resources from trusted publishers, and allow you to access the full text of these books right from your home!

Check out this New Reader Overview video to learn more!

Three Part Series: Library Assessment Snapshots – Part 3

What did you learn at your library instruction class?*

This question allows the library to understand the qualitative aspects of a student’s experience in the library instruction sessions.

Some favorite comments are things like: “I learned how to minimize your research options and make it more efficient” or “Lots! How to research without just surfing the web” or “Librarian did an excellent job. Took away the fear of research and made it easy.”

Below we have listed the most common categories in which we receive comments.

Most helpful thing learned Respondents
Database usage 303
Different resources 72
Keyword searching technique 65
Research techniques 62
Citations 59
Narrowing technique 59
Research Guide 57
Other search technique(s) 46
Internet searching 43
Library website 38
*This three part series will give you a snapshot of the Library Instruction Assessment data, which has been collected from students attending library sessions since Fall 2014. This particular snapshot includes data gathered from 1003 students who attended 91 library sessions in Spring 2016, as well as comments from students in Fall 2016.

Contact Marge Schildknecht (mschildknecht@elgin.edu) for more information about the library’s efforts to improve our library instruction services through this data collection process.

Jana–Submitted by Jana Porter, Reference Librarian