Category Archives: Resource

For new and highlighted library resources.

Don’t stress about citing!

stressMake your life easier by checking out the citing guide options below.

MLA

APA

Chicago/Turabian

NoodleTools is an online tool that can assist you in organizing your research, including notecards, sharing, and creating your bibliography/works cited page. See the NoodleTools Research Guide for step-by-step instructions.

The Write Place offers writing assistance. They are located in Building B, Room B274. Any student or ECC employee can use this service.  Stop by Building B, Room B274, or call 847-214-7480 for information. Hours:  Monday  and Tuesday 9 am to 7 pm (closed from 3 to 4 pm), Wednesday and Thursday 9 am to 6 pm (closed from 3 to 4 pm) and Friday 10 am to 1 pm.

Don’t forget that you can also get personalized citation help from the ECC Librarians. We are available during all of our library hours (many nights until 10 p.m.) and have experience in the various formats.  Contact us by email, chat, text, phone, and in person.

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Free quiet! Get a room…

group study….a study room!

Need a peaceful, quiet study space?  Want to work on a group project?  The library’s study rooms are the answer!

Study rooms:

  • Are checked out on your library account at the library’s Circulation Desk on the first floor;
  • Cannot be reserved: they are first come, first served, for three hour increments (you and the key must stay in the library during your 3 hour check-out period);
  • May contain flat screens that can be hooked up to a laptop;
  • On the first floor contain large whiteboards.  Other rooms may have small whiteboards;
  • Come in various sizes, so rooms can accommodate as few as 1-2 people, and up to 10 people.

Contact the Circulation Desk for more information or come to the library to check one out! If you have other questions, check out the library’s FAQ on study spaces here.

Resource Spotlight: PsycArticles & PsycInfo

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When students have research to do for psychology class and they need high quality, credible, academic information, they turn to PsycArticles & PsycInfo. But have you considered other aspects of your topic that may have a psychological component?

For example:

  • You may be doing business research on marketing to certain segments of the population. PsycArticles may have research on buying habits and the psychological basis for them.
  • Maybe you are working on a paper on coaching in sports. If you are taking an approach that discusses the role of coach and parents, PsycInfo may have some good information on how that dynamic plays a role in the success of the athlete.

The difference between the two is that PsycArticles contains full text professional psychology journals, whereas PsycInfo has a more comprehensive overview of psychology research and may be full text, abstracts, or just citations.

To use these databases, go to the Article Databases link on the library’s webpage. The databases are in alphabetical order, or you can click on the “P” to jump to those databases.

You will need your Student ID activated as your library card to use these databases from off campus. If you need assistance using the database, please contact the library.

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–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

For faculty (and your students!) Interlibrary Loan

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Image courtesy of  mememaker.net

What is Interlibrary Loan:

Interlibrary Loan is the process by which the library will request materials not available in our own collection. Items are delivered to the library and you can pick them up and check them out just like any other library item. Items are usually free.

Why you should care:
This means that you can get just about any item you want, from any library, without having to try to find it yourself, for free.

The service includes books, journal articles, DVDs, videos, and other materials.

Plan ahead–sometimes items  can come quickly, but giving a week to 10 days for the item is a good rule of thumb.

Need to use it?
You can find the policies and form here.

For questions, contact Armando Trejo, Archives/Interlibrary Loan Librarian at (847) 214-7141.

Resource Spotlight: Research Guides

Research Guides are online guides that provide quick access to databases, websites, books, ebooks and other resources on a given topic or for a specific class or assignment. Research Guides are a great starting point for your research, and have been created in consultation with your instructor.

It does what it says: it “guides your research” to the best sources to begin with on that topic. Guides are set up with tabs that lead you to subtopics within that guide, such as article databases, websites, books/ ebooks, citing, choosing a topic, search strategies, and more.

Tabs

To get started, click on Research Guides on the main library webpage.

Research Guide1

Find your topic on the alphabetical list. Then explore the guides either by the subject area or the guide created for your particular class. It’s that easy!

Research Guide2

To use resources off campus, you will need to activate your student ID with the Circulation Desk (847-214-7337 or circdesk@elgin.edu.)

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Resource Spotlight: Ethnic News Watch

proquestEthnic News Watch is a database that covers both current and past newspapers, magazines, and journals from ethnic, minority, and native presses. The complete collection also includes the module Ethnic NewsWatch: A History™, which provides historical coverage of Native American, African American, and Hispanic American periodicals from 1959-1989.

This full-text collection covers more than 2.5 million articles from over 340 publications. It is a great place to research on topics related to:

    • Ethnic groups
    • Minorities
    • Multi-cultural
    • Human rights
    • Activism
    • …and individual ethnicities from around the globe
–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

 

 

 

Resource Spotlight: Nexis Uni

SocialBanner nexisReplacing Lexis Nexis is a new, academic based database from Lexis called Nexis Uni.

This database provides a wide variety of authoritative sources, including: newspapers, broadcast transcripts from the major television and radio networks; wire services; non-English language news sources, and legal sources such as law reviews and case law.

Nexis Uni is currently available to on-campus users only.

To learn more about Nexis Uni, check out this video:

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian