Category Archives: Resource

For new and highlighted library resources.

For faculty: How to find a journal title in the library’s print/online collections

Full Text Finder is a service you would use if you want to know if a magazine or journal article can be found in its entirety (full text) through our library’s collection.  Many of these journals also allow you to create an RSS Feed and/or Create an Alert, so you can keep up with the latest articles in your discipline.

Find Full Text Finder on the Article Databases webpage, by choosing “F” on the alphabetical list. It is also located under the Research drop down box on our home page under Find a Specific Journal.

To use Full Text Finder, simply type in the title you want to search.FTF search

Once you search the title, if the title is available in our collections, you will get a screen like this, with your link to the full text access:FTF results

You can also browse the journals by discipline (subject area). Click on the subject you want to explore, such as Biology, History, Marketing, etc:FTF discipline

If you need help using this tool or finding out if we carry a particular title, please contact us!

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian
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Resource Spotlight: Bloomberg QuickTakes in CREDO Reference

As part of the CREDO Reference database, you now have access to Bloomberg QuickTakes, which are billed as “hard to explain topics, explained simply.”  This is a great place to go to get a basic and reliable explanation of an issue.

Once you do a search on the topic of your choice, if there is a QuickTake for the topic, it will appear under the left sidebar, under Filter Your Search: Real Time Reference:

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Here is an example of an explanation of Bitcoin.

QuickTakes are not available on every topic; however, CREDO Reference itself has a great number of definitions and encyclopedic entries that can help you understand a topic.

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian, with contributions from Marge Schildknecht, Public Services Librarian

 

 

New Online Psychology Resource!

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The ECC Library is happy to announce that it now has online access to the DSM 5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition), as well as the Clinical Cases and Handbook of Differential Diagnosis. These resources are used by clinicians, students, and researchers to assist in the diagnosis of mental disorders. The information included focuses on characteristics, treatments, and research of these disorders, as well as presents specific cases and approaches to diagnosis.

Don’t worry–we still have our print versions of the DSM 5 in Reference!

–Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

 

 

 

Resource Spotlight: Primary Resources

Primary and secondary resources are both important parts of the research process. Primary resources can provide you with a first-hand account of an event as it happened and give you immediate reaction uncolored by distance from the event.

This video explains primary and secondary resources:

The ECC Library subscribes to many resources that have a primary resource focus. To this end, we have created a Primary Sources Research Guide which will walk you through books, databases, newspapers, and more available to you free.

Some to check out:

Librarians are happy to help you navigate or explore these resources; contact us!
–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Don’t stress about citing!

stressMake your life easier by checking out the citing guide options below.

MLA

APA

Chicago/Turabian

NoodleTools is an online tool that can assist you in organizing your research, including notecards, sharing, and creating your bibliography/works cited page. See the NoodleTools Research Guide for step-by-step instructions.

The Write Place offers writing assistance. They are located in Building B, Room B274. Any student or ECC employee can use this service.  Stop by Building B, Room B274, or call 847-214-7480 for information. Hours:  Monday  and Tuesday 9 am to 7 pm (closed from 3 to 4 pm), Wednesday and Thursday 9 am to 6 pm (closed from 3 to 4 pm) and Friday 10 am to 1 pm.

Don’t forget that you can also get personalized citation help from the ECC Librarians. We are available during all of our library hours (many nights until 10 p.m.) and have experience in the various formats.  Contact us by email, chat, text, phone, and in person.

Free quiet! Get a room…

group study….a study room!

Need a peaceful, quiet study space?  Want to work on a group project?  The library’s study rooms are the answer!

Study rooms:

  • Are checked out on your library account at the library’s Circulation Desk on the first floor;
  • Cannot be reserved: they are first come, first served, for three hour increments (you and the key must stay in the library during your 3 hour check-out period);
  • May contain flat screens that can be hooked up to a laptop;
  • On the first floor contain large whiteboards.  Other rooms may have small whiteboards;
  • Come in various sizes, so rooms can accommodate as few as 1-2 people, and up to 10 people.

Contact the Circulation Desk for more information or come to the library to check one out! If you have other questions, check out the library’s FAQ on study spaces here.

Resource Spotlight: PsycArticles & PsycInfo

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When students have research to do for psychology class and they need high quality, credible, academic information, they turn to PsycArticles & PsycInfo. But have you considered other aspects of your topic that may have a psychological component?

For example:

  • You may be doing business research on marketing to certain segments of the population. PsycArticles may have research on buying habits and the psychological basis for them.
  • Maybe you are working on a paper on coaching in sports. If you are taking an approach that discusses the role of coach and parents, PsycInfo may have some good information on how that dynamic plays a role in the success of the athlete.

The difference between the two is that PsycArticles contains full text professional psychology journals, whereas PsycInfo has a more comprehensive overview of psychology research and may be full text, abstracts, or just citations.

To use these databases, go to the Article Databases link on the library’s webpage. The databases are in alphabetical order, or you can click on the “P” to jump to those databases.

You will need your Student ID activated as your library card to use these databases from off campus. If you need assistance using the database, please contact the library.

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–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian