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Tastes of Summer!

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Following the Culinary Arts Month theme, here are some recipes that are taste tested and simple and give you the flavor of summer. 

Blueberry Scones with Lemon Glaze (Food Network). These come out light and flavorful. The glaze provides a sweet/tart aspect.  Great for a Sunday morning with coffee or tea.

Rhubarb Pie (Allrecipes). If you think you don’t like rhubarb, think again! This super simple and old fashioned recipe firms up well and is great with whipped cream or ice cream.

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Burst Cherry Tomato Pasta (Epicurious).  This fresh and easy recipe can be adjusted to any serving size. Add in some red pepper chili flake for a kick, or some anchovies for umami. I use bucatini pasta instead of spaghetti as is has a thicker density and holds the sauce well. Serve with a side salad and garlic toast.

Mojito (Allrecipes). You can make this with or without the rum; just adjust to add more lime or soda. It is very refreshing and you can adjust the recipe to add watermelon, or make it with cucumber and basil.  The lime-ier, the better!

pizza-814044_1280Grilled Pizza (Simply Recipes). This recipe provides you with the process of grilling a pizza.   Use your favorite homemade or store bought dough (here is a good recipe if you haven’t done this before), and add any type of toppings that will use up your summer produce. Pizza grills quickly and gets a nice, chewy char, so keep an eye on it.

Watermelon-Feta Salad (PBS). Refreshing on a hot day and a great way to make a salad ahead for a group gathering.  You can leave out the onions and it is just as good.  Be sure to not over-mix; you want the feta to maintain some of its integrity.melon-1606061_640.jpg

Do you have a favorite summer recipe? Share in the comments!

—Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

July is National Culinary Arts Month!

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Here are some highlighted resources for our culinary arts students and faculty in honor of Culinary Arts Month!

Research Guides: these guides help students focus on the resources they need most for their research, including books, websites, and databases.

Magazines in the library (available for checkout):

  • Chef
  • Bon Appetit
  • Cooking Light
  • Cook’s Illustrated
  • Food Magazine
  • Saveur

Online trade publications:

Ebooks:

Plunkett Research: Find market research, industry Statistics, trends and in-depth analysis of companies, including industries such as Hotels & Travel, Green Technology, International Companies, Retailing, and Sports.

Gale Virtual Reference Library: Contains many works related to food, such as Food: In Context, Career Opportunities in the Food and Beverage Industry, and Encyclopedia of Food and Culture.

Ebrary: Search by a term such as culinary, cuisine or cooking for many culinary works, from the scholarly to the practical.

Print books:

These books are available in our library.  Click here to view a list of books under the subject of Cooking. We also have cookbooks by well-known chefs, including Bobby Flay, Ina Garten, Emeril, Rachael Ray, Julia Child, Jacques Pepin, and more.

Selected works:beatenseared

Beaten, Seared, and Sauced: On Becoming a Chef at the Culinary Institute of America

Vegan Vegetarian Omnivore

1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die

1000places

The Making of a Chef

The Jemima Code: Two Centuries of African-American Cookbooks

100million100 Million Years of Food

Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation

Professional Baking

Kings of Pastry (DVD)

*All covers courtesy of Amazon.com

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–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Summer Travel-whatever your budget!

travel verb trav·el \ˈtra-vəl\

  1. a :  to journey through or over
    b :  to follow (a course or path) as if by traveling

  2. to traverse (a specified distance)

    —Definition from Merriam Webster

To travel, to journey, to traverse–many of us dream of places we would like to go or things we would like to do or see.  According to this article in Psychology Today, traveling can change our personalities by making us more open and helping us gain perspective. Travel can even cause us to be more agreeable (not so sure about that one…)

In the Chicago area, we are fortunate to have many options close to us to fulfill our wanderlust. We may also want to dream–where would we like to travel farther afield? Here are some options to get you started on your own personal journey!

Near: Chicago is a first class city with so many things to see and do, many for free. From Starved Rock to Springfield to Cantigny, you can also find some great places beyond Chicago that won’t break the bank.

15 Top Rated Tourist Attractions in Chicago

Chicago Architecture Foundation River Cruise chicago-cloud-gate-1479046003K70

Hidden Illinois: 208 Cool and Unusual Things to Do in Illinois

Things to Do In Illinois

Far: Want to plan a trip? These sites offer choices that may be more affordable than you think!

Travel & Leisure’s America’s Best Cities for Summer Travel

30 Cheapest Places to Travel in 2017

3d-world-globe-1395755666ztfTravel & Leisure’s 13 Affordable Trips to Europe

Travel Canada: Canadian Attractions

Armchair traveler? If you want to satisfy your inner travel bug for free, try these books and films that you can get at ECC Library. Be inspired by another’s travel experience, or enjoy a DVD that can take you into another place and time.

media_bookBooks

Eat Pray Love

A Walk in the Woods

Into the Wild

A Year in Provence

The Traveler: an American Odyssey in the Himalaya

Tao of Travel: Enlightenment from Lives on the Road

Good Girl’s Guide to Getting Lost

Fearless: One Woman, One Kayak, One Continent

A Moveable Feast: Life Changing Food Adventures from Around the World

media_filmFilm

Wild

Life of Pi

National Parks Exploration Series

Voyage to the Galapagos

Australia Revealed

Wonders of the African World

Shackleton

Have a favorite destination or travel book or movie? Tell us in the comments!

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—Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Recommended Watching & Listening

play-30619_640The library has created a Research Guide called Recommended Watching/Listening dedicated to media viewing and listening. It offers review websites, podcasts, audio and video database resources, and more to help you decide what to watch or listen to whether on your commute, studying a topic for school, or at the beach.

You can also check out last year’s Summer Listening, Podcast Edition blog post here.

Summer Reading–from your ECC Library staff & librarians!

Each year we do a post on books we have enjoyed and suggest for summer reading.* Here are some old and new favorites! Items available in the ECC Library collection are noted.

Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? by Roz Chast. It is a graphic novel memoir that is both funny and sad about the challenges of taking care of aging parents. I was surprised at how much it made me laugh considering the topic.–Stacey Shah, Distance Learning Librarian. Available at ECC Library811CNUyahEL

LaRose by Louis Erdrich. A tragedy almost destroys neighboring families but an arrangement based on Ojibwe tribe tradition acts as a catalyses to help them heal and come to a new appreciation of each other.  Rich storytelling from a renowned Native American author. Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Ficton. –Barb Evans, Reference Librarian. Available at ECC Library

 The Girl Before  by JP Delaney. In my constant search for reading all books with “girl” in the title, I just finished this fresh thriller. It takes place in a minimalist, state of the art, high tech smart house built by an eccentric architect.  The occupants have to agree  to some unusual rules to be able to live there.  Throughout the history of this fabulous   home a few unexplained deaths have happened. The story keeps you guessing until the end!  –Kristy Yemm Pemrich, Library Clerk.

Out Stealing Horses by Per Petterson.  A fateful summer in his youth colors the rest of Trond’s life in this memoir-like story of life and loss by Norwegian author, Per Petterson. A short but powerful story.   –Barb Evans, Reference Librarian. Available at ECC Library

Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier. This seaside tale features several women who are amateur scientists in 19th century England.  One particular woman, poor and uneducated Mary Anning, has a unique gift to spot fossils no one else can see.  When she uncovers an unusual fossilized skeleton, she causes major upsets in the religious and scientific communities of the day. –Barb Evans, Reference Librarian. Available at ECC Library

designfordying

Cover from Amazon.com

Design for Dying and Dangerous to Know by Renee Patrick. Totally frivolous and an easy read, but a decent option to take to the beach if you like mysteries, strong female characters, and 1930s Hollywood. —Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

The Portable Dorothy Parker. Containing poetry, articles, stories, and letters, this collection still resonates as snarky and caustic today. My favorite collection is the poetry missive Enough Rope, which was published in 1926 and is both hopeful of love and yet aware of the pain it inevitably had caused.  –Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian. Available at ECC Library

Lab Girl  by Hope Jahren. From the Amazon description: “In these pages, Hope takes us back to her Minnesota childhood, where she spent hours in unfettered play in her father’s college laboratory. She tells us how she found a sanctuary in science, learning to perform lab work “with both the heart and the hands.”Jen Schlau, Reference/Instruction Librarian.

Hillbilly Elegy  by J.D. Vance. A great memoir/insight into working class culture, particularly those in Appalachia who ended up in what is now the Rust Belt (Ohio, Pennsylvania, some Michigan)–Jen Schlau, Reference/Instruction Librarian. Available at ECC Library

Homegoing – A work of fiction about how slavery altered the course of two family lines.–Jen Schlau, Reference/Instruction Librarian

nix

Courtesy of Amazon.com

The Nix by Nathan Hill. This sprawling novel grabbed me from the beginning. Hilarious skewering of higher education, and lots of heart to boot! I loved this book. –Julie Keating, Reference Librarian. Coming soon to ECC Library!

Year of Yes: How to Dance It Out, Stand In the Sun and Be Your Own Person by Shonda Rhimes. I was emboldened by Shonda Rhimes’ journey to embrace herself while she tackled motherhood, anxiety, feminism, weight issues, work, and marriage. Sometimes, as women, our hardest challenge is learning to say “yes to no”. –Kristina Howard, Reference/Instruction Librarian

 
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles. A beautifully written account of a Russian aristocrat who is sentenced to house arrest in one of the most glamorous hotels in Moscow. –Julie Keating, Reference Librarian.

American Ulysses: A Life of Ulysses S. Grant by Ronald C. White, Jr A new biography of our 18th President.–Julie Keating, Reference Librarian. Available at ECC Library

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond. This work “takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge.”-Julie Keathing, Reference Librarian. Available at ECC Library

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin BoysinBoatOlympics by Daniel James Brown. From Amazon: Drawing on the boys’ own journals and vivid memories of a once-in-a-lifetime shared dream, Brown has created an unforgettable portrait of an era, a celebration of a remarkable achievement, and a chronicle of one extraordinary young man’s personal quest.–Julie Keating, Reference Librarian

Bel Canto by Ann Patchett. A heartbreaking story about music, language, and love. A group of terrorist hold their hostages for several months. Many of them do not share a language, but they all share a love for Roxane Coss’s (a famous opera soprano) singing. It is her music that creates a space for compassion and love.–Kristina Howard, Reference/Instruction Librarian. Available at ECC Library

*Other summer reading suggestions can be found here under the Book Review tag, or view the 2015 and 2016 Summer Reading posts for more titles.

–Contributions by Stacey Shah, Maria Bagshaw,  Jennifer Schlau, Barb Evans, Julie Keating, Kristina Howard, Kristy Yemm Pemrick

June is LGBTQ Pride month

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What is LGBTQ Pride Month?

Learn: 

Originally declared by President Clinton in 2000, further proclamations declaring June as LGBT Pride Month have been declared for the past 8 years.  The Library of Congress has a wonderful collection of primary materials you can explore as well. From their website:

The Library’s numerous collections contain many books, posters, sound recordings, manuscripts and other material produced by, about and for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community. Learn more here.

Explore: 

LGBTQ Graphic Novels Bibliography from ALA

Book awards:

In the ECC Library:

Nonfiction

Fiction:

At ECC:

Our institution protects the rights of our LGBTQ community.  ECC has six gender neutral and family bathrooms and transgender students may utilize those bathrooms to which their gender conforms. These bathrooms are located around campus and can also be used as nursing rooms. The bathrooms labeled “family” can be found in A158, C133, K104, and K159. The bathrooms labeled “unisex” can be found in H139, H140, E100.4 and E216.02.

Your Wellness Professionals also provide support and services for the LGBTQ community. One such service is a template you can give to your professor before classes begin about preferred names and pronouns.  Please contact Wellness Services at studentwellness@elgin.edu if you would like more resources, or if you have any questions.

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Summer Hours for ECC Library Announced

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By jgoge CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org)

 

The ECC Library will have the following hours during the summer months:

May 19- June 1, 2017
Monday-Friday

8:00 a.m.-5:oo p.m.

June 5- August 10, 2017
Monday-Thursday
7:30 a.m. -10:00 p.m.

CLOSED
Saturday/Sunday May 20 & 21 and May 27 & 28

CLOSED Fridays-Sundays
June 2-August 6

Also 
closed Monday, May 29 for Memorial Day and Tuesday, July 4,
 for Independence Day.

Please contact the Circulation Desk if you have any questions at 847-214-7337.  Hours and closures can also be found on our website.