Category Archives: Information

For general informational items.

Hours for Winter Recess

christmas-1911637_640Here are the hours for December 14, 2018 – January 13, 2019:

Friday, Dec. 14  7:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Saturday, Dec. 15 CLOSED

December 17-December 21 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

December 22-January 1 CLOSED for Winter Recess

January 2-January 9 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Thursday, January 10 (Convocation) 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Friday, January 11 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Saturday, January 12 & Sunday, January 13 CLOSED

Semester Hours resume at 7:45 a.m. on Monday, January 14, 2019

Have a happy and healthy holiday season!

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Need something the library doesn’t own? Try Interlibrary Loan!

InterlibraryLoan

Created with IMGFlip: https://imgflip.com/memegenerator

What is Interlibrary Loan:

Interlibrary Loan is the process by which the library will request materials not available in our own collection. Items are delivered to the library and you can pick them up and check them out just like any other library item. Items are usually free.

Why you should care:
This means that you can get just about any item you want, from any library, without having to try to find it yourself, for free.

The service includes books, journal articles, DVDs, videos, and other materials.

Plan ahead–sometimes items can come quickly, but giving a week to 10 days for the item is a good rule of thumb.

Need to use it?
You can find the policies and form here.

For questions, contact Armando Trejo, Archives/Interlibrary Loan Librarian at (847) 214-7141.

Race and Police Brutality in YA Literature: A Review

HateUGiveNothing kicks off a book like a well-made movie of the book.  But Angie Thomas’s first novel, The Hate U Give – title derived from a Tupac lyric – also places a harsh light on reality in many young adult lives.

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer.

What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.  But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

Thomas is not the only YA author to use police brutality as a theme.  Jason Reynolds, who has been called the new Walter Dean Myers, objects, “This isn’t a literary trend. This is an issue of our time.”

All AmericanHis All American Boys, written with Brendan Kiely, features an African-American teenager who is assaulted by an officer who mistakes him for a shoplifter.  A classmate, who is both white and a close neighbor of the officer, witnesses the incident. Will he tell what really happened?

Alter, Alexandra. “New Crop of Young Adult Novels Explores Race and Police Brutality.” New York Times, 19 March 2017, p. A1.

Police violence against unarmed African-Americans has also been well covered through nonfiction, in books like Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Between the World and Me, which won the National Book Award, and Wesley Lowery’s They Can’t Kill Us All.

Between the WorldWhat is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden?

Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children’s lives were taken as American plunder.

LoweryThey Can’t Kill Us All: Ferguson, Baltimore, and a New Era in America’s Racial Justice Movement by Wesley Lowery

A deeply reported book that brings alive the quest for justice in the deaths of Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Freddie Gray, offering both unparalleled insight into the reality of police violence in America and an intimate, moving portrait of those working to end it.

Conducting hundreds of interviews during the course of over one year reporting on the ground, Washington Post writer Wesley Lowery traveled from Ferguson, Missouri, to Cleveland, Ohio; Charleston, South Carolina; and Baltimore, Maryland; and then back to Ferguson to uncover life inside the most heavily policed, if otherwise neglected, corners of America today.

–Written by Mary Spevacek, Reference Librarian
*All cover art courtesy of Amazon.com

Book Display: Books by current and past ECC faculty

FAC Book displayEllie Swanson, Technical Services Librarian, has created a book display showcasing ECC faculty-authored books. Highlighted are works by the late Bill Pelz (Against Capitalism: the European left on the march), Baudelaire Ulysse (Racialized Consciousness: Mapping the genealogy of racial identity and manifestations in socio-political discourses), Roberto Suro (Strangers Among Us: How Latino immigration is transforming America), several by Mary Ellen Goodwill, and more.

The display is located on the 2nd floor of the library, Building C. The books will be on display until the first week of November. Any of the works can be checked out by choosing your favorite and taking it to the Circulation Desk on the 1st floor with your student ID.

The English Assassin Book Review

silva.jpgHave you read or watched the movie the “Da Vinci Code” by Dan Brown?  If you liked this author, then you may like Daniel Silva, who is consistently on the New York Times bestseller list. Like a James Bond movie, Silva’s books are fast-paced, based in European countries, and full of compelling characters, including a hero fighting to “right wrongs.”

“The English Assassin” is about the looting of Jewish paintings during WWII and a provocative historical view that Swiss bankers traded hard currency for Nazi gold. As compensation, these bankers received thousands of paintings taken by the Nazis from Jews during the Holocaust. Our hero is Israeli spy and art restorer, Gabriel Allon. Allon goes to Zurich and discovers the body of Augustus Rolfe, a prominent Swiss banker murdered when his conscience gets the better of him. His daughter, Anna Rolfe, a renowned violinist becomes Allon’s key accomplice, and the two dodge the English Assassin in order to uncover Rolfe’s hidden past and the secrets of a hidden Swiss banking aristocracy.

Silva’s books, while fiction, focus on history, art, and religion, and in this book, Swiss culture and music. If you are like me, you may want to follow-up with some fact checking of Silva’s historically based storyline. Daniel Silva with his Conspiracy/Espionage Thrillers is currently one of my favorite authors. Let me know if he becomes one of yours.

jana–Submitted by Jana Porter, Reference Librarian

Open Access Week: October 22-28, 2018

OA Week 2018 Post Twitter.png

From the website:

Open Access Week, a global event now entering its tenth year, is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. http://openaccessweek.org/page/about

Check out the events, groups, and Q&A to learn more.

The movie Paywall, The Business of Scholarship, also informs on some the issues surrounding open access versus profit margins and the importance of open scholarship to all. Check it out here:

Paywall: The Business of Scholarship (Full Movie) CC BY 4.0 from Paywall The Movie on Vimeo.
–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

 

Oral History brings the ECC past alive!

Did you know the library has links to oral interviews with prominent Elgin Community College professors, staff, and board members?

Here are our latest interviews:

For a list of our past oral interviews, visit our Archives page. These new interviews will be uploaded soon!

–Thank you to Armando Trejo, Archivist and Librarian, for his dedication and hard work in maintaining our past and present!