Thanksgiving Hours for ECC Library

lego-thanksgiving

Image by martha_chapa95. CC BY 2.0

The library hours for the week of November 20-26 will be as follows:

Monday & Tuesday, November 20 & November 21:
7:45 a.m.-10:00 p.m.
Wednesday, November 22: 7:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Closed: Thursday, November 23-Sunday, November 26

The library will reopen at 7:45 a.m. on Monday, November 27.

Remember that many of our online resources are available to you 24/7 by having your Student ID/Library Card updated through our Circulation Desk.  Please contact 847-214-7337 or circdesk@elgin.edu before 5:00 p.m on November 22nd to update your card. Contact our Reference Desk for other questions.

Advertisements

For faculty (and students): Interlibrary Loan

ILL

Photo via Meme Maker

What is Interlibrary Loan:
Interlibrary Loan is the process by which the library will request materials not available in our own collection. Items are delivered to the library and you can pick them up and check them out just like any other library item. Items are usually free.

Why you should care:
This means that you can get just about any item you want, from any library, without having to try to find it yourself, for free.

The service includes books, journal articles, DVDs, videos, and other materials.

Plan ahead–sometimes items  can come quickly, but giving a week to 10 days for the item is a good rule of thumb.

Need to use it?
You can find the policies and form here.

For questions, contact Armando Trejo, Archives/Interlibrary Loan Librarian at (847) 214-7141.

Resource Spotlight: READ IT! Database for ESL/ELL

EBSCO’s Read It! database “was created for anyone who has a good foundation in English grammar and reading skills. It is a place to find reading material about many subjects. Articles are short, and written to support your reading skills as you learn about topics in English that you need for school and everyday life.”

read-it.png
Highlights include:

  • ELL reading level/lexile information available for each article.
  • Users can HIGHLIGHT and LISTEN to a term in context to enable better comprehension.
  • Comprehension tests are available at the end of many articles, with a mix of multiple choice and fill in the blank.  This helps students to test their level of understanding.
  • Users can use REFINE to choose a specific reading level.
  • In an Advanced Search, the user can choose a specific reading level.
  • Articles can be emailed, printed, saved, and cited.

The library has an ESL/ELL Research Guide with additional resources. Within this guide is a tab that provides more in-depth coverage of the READ IT! database.

If you have any questions about the database or using it as a faculty or a student, please contact the library.

—Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

 

Tree of Smoke Book Review

treeofsmoke

Cover art courtesy of Amazon.com

Tree of Smoke
by Denis Johnson

Fic J66t

With the onset of PBS’s broadcast of the Ken Burns film series, The Vietnam War, it’s a good time to revisit some of the novels written about the war. Denis Johnson’s Tree of Smoke is one of the great ones. Winner of the 2007 National Book Award, the novel follows four main characters through their experiences in the war from 1963 to 1970, with a conclusion which takes place in 1983. Two of the characters are brothers of low rank in the military. The other two are high ranking: an uncle and nephew involved in the secret service. Although the book does a good job relaying the wartime atmosphere, especially the constant uncertainty, it does a great job of relaying the sense loss and grief. This book is not for the timid and it took me awhile to get through it, but it is definitely worth the effort.  Denis Johnson was awarded the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction this past July. He passed away on May 24, 2017.

Barb Evans Photo 11-20-13

–Submitted by Barbara Evans, Reference Librarian

Open Access Week: October 23-29, 2017

OpenAccessWeek_logo“Open in order to…” serves as a prompt to move beyond talking about openness in itself and focus on what openness enables—in an individual discipline, at a particular institution, or in a specific context; then to take action to realize these benefits.–Nick Shockey, Open Access Week blog

Beginning in 2008, open access week strives to open up research to more of the scholarly and general community. The key tenets focus around increasing access to knowledge, facilitating collaboration, and raising your own research visibility to the greater world.

To view past videos of Open Access discussions, see their website.

There is also a list of events available in the United States, or view the map to see past and present events from around the world.https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=1X7INUOEhXpnGU2x36UFRs4WMcWk

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Resource Spotlight: HeinOnline Immigration Law and Policy

HeinOnlineThe Immigration Law and Policy database from HeinOnline offers a compilation of important historical documents and legislation related to immigration in the United States as well as current hearings, debates and recent developments in immigration law. This database includes BIA Precedent Decisions, legislative histories, law and policy titles, extradition titles, scholarly articles, an extensive bibliography, and other related works.

Containing 1,580 titles and over 2,100 volumes, this is a great place to send students working on sociology, political science, current events, law, hot topics in the news, and even for personal interest.

If you have questions about using the database, please contact us!

–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

FREE for you: New York Times Digital Edition!

Good news! The library has a brand new subscription to the New York Times digital edition This is the web version of the New York Times, rather than a database version. It includes full access to all articles dating back to 1851 right from a mobile device or a computer. You can register to have free, personal access through this new subscription.  Here are the steps:

  • Using a student.elgin.edu or elgin.edu email account, create a personal account for full access to NYT from 1851-present.
  • Account registration works best in a Chrome browser.
  • You only need to register at this link once. After that, you can go directly to nytimes.com and login with your personal account.

Access to the New York Times in text form for student research is still available through the library’s newspaper databases.

–Written by Marge Schildknecht, Public Services Librarian