Resource Spotlight: ebrary

ebrary
Ebrary
is an online e-book database that offers access to a wide variety of topics including: anthropology, business, computers, education, English, fine arts, history, language, law, psychology, religion, science, and social sciences.

The database offers the flexibility to browse by topic or search for a specific term.  These e-books offer authoritative resources from trusted publishers, and allow you to access the full text of these books right from your home!

Check out this New Reader Overview video to learn more!

Three Part Series: Library Assessment Snapshots – Part 3

What did you learn at your library instruction class?*

This question allows the library to understand the qualitative aspects of a student’s experience in the library instruction sessions.

Some favorite comments are things like: “I learned how to minimize your research options and make it more efficient” or “Lots! How to research without just surfing the web” or “Librarian did an excellent job. Took away the fear of research and made it easy.”

Below we have listed the most common categories in which we receive comments.

Most helpful thing learned Respondents
Database usage 303
Different resources 72
Keyword searching technique 65
Research techniques 62
Citations 59
Narrowing technique 59
Research Guide 57
Other search technique(s) 46
Internet searching 43
Library website 38
*This three part series will give you a snapshot of the Library Instruction Assessment data, which has been collected from students attending library sessions since Fall 2014. This particular snapshot includes data gathered from 1003 students who attended 91 library sessions in Spring 2016, as well as comments from students in Fall 2016.

Contact Marge Schildknecht (mschildknecht@elgin.edu) for more information about the library’s efforts to improve our library instruction services through this data collection process.

Jana–Submitted by Jana Porter, Reference Librarian

Earth Day 2017: Environmental and Climate Literacy

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Environmental and climate literacy is the engine not only for creating green voters and advancing environmental and climate laws and policies but also for accelerating green technologies and jobs.–Earth Day Network

Educate yourself on the issues surrounding climate change, and examine the scientific evidence. Being sustainable in your own life, even by making small changes, can help to mitigate climate change and make your environment, and that of your community, cleaner and healthier.

How can you help?

Maria2016(2)
–Written by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Two new books on women innovators

WomanbooksWomen’s History Month may have passed, but women are always part of the story!

The library just received two brand new works that address women who have been instrumental in many areas of history.

Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventor, and Trailblazers Who Changed History by Sam Maggs and illustrated by Sophia Foster-Dimino (General Collection)

Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World, written and illustrated by Rachel Ignotofsky (Children’s Collection)

Thanks to Kristy Yemm-Pemrick , Library Clerk, for promoting these cool new books!

Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Three Part Series: Library Assessment Snapshots – Part 2

If you’ve been to a library class several times, how was the material different and thus still beneficial to you?*

Perhaps surprisingly the data below shows that students actually find their subsequent library sessions just as beneficial, if not more, than the previous one(s).

Chart_Usefulness

Note in the table above that overall the students never in a library session before (0) gave the session a 4.49. Those in all the subsequent categories gave the session an overall usefulness of 4.53. This suggests that more than one library session is beneficial to most students.

*This three part series will give you a snapshot of the Library Instruction Assessment data, which has been collected from students attending library sessions since Fall 2014. The snapshot is from data gathered from 1056 students who attended 120 library sessions in Fall 2016.

Contact Marge Schildknecht for more information about the library’s efforts to improve our library instruction services through this data collection process.

Jana–Submitted by Jana Porter, Reference Librarian

#LibrariesTransform: Celebrate National Library Week April 9-15!

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Libraries provide innumerable services to their communities, whether a public, academic, or special library.  From a recent Pew Report, Americans value their libraries and services overwhelmingly, and see libraries as an integral place in their communities, a place that will provide you with trustworthy information and a variety of perspectives.

This video was created during last year’s library week–check it out to see the exciting things happening at your libraries!

Check out the National Library Week website, and follow along on social media:

#NationalLibraryWeek

#LibrariesTransform

#SaveIMLS (Don’t know what this is? More information here)

Twitter I Love LibrariesTwitter

Facebook I Love LibrariesFacebook

Maria2016(2)–Submitted by Maria Bagshaw, Reference/Instruction Librarian

 

For faculty (and your students!): Interlibrary Loan

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Image courtesy of  mememaker.net

What is Interlibrary Loan:

Interlibrary Loan is the process by which the library will request materials not available in our own collection. Items are delivered to the library and you can pick them up and check them out just like any other library item. Items are usually free.

Why you should care:
This means that you can get just about any item you want, from any library, without having to try to find it yourself, for free.

The service includes books, journal articles, DVDs, videos, and other materials.

Plan ahead–sometimes items  can come quickly, but giving a week to 10 days for the item is a good rule of thumb.

Need to use it?
You can find the policies and form here.

For questions, contact Armando Trejo, Archives/Interlibrary Loan Librarian at (847) 214-7141.